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Siguil Hydro Power Plant in Sarangani On-Schedule to deliver Renewable Energy in 2022

by Philippine Resources - October 18, 2021

The Alsons Power group’s 14.5 mega-watt (MW) ₱ 4.5 billion run- of- river hydroelectric power plant at the Siguil River basin in Maasim, Sarangani Province is on- track to begin operations in 2022 to provide a source of renewable power to key areas of Mindanao.

The photo shows ongoing work on the plant’s powerhouse that will contain the hydropower turbine and generator set which will produce electricity using water from the Siguil River. It will also house the power facility’s control Room and offices for administration, operations and maintenance.

Alsons Power- Mindanao’s firs private sector power generator plans to develop at least seven more run of river hydro power facilities in different parts of Mindanao and Negros Occidental.  The group currently operates four power facilities in Mindanao with a total generating capacity of 468 MW serving over 8 million people in 14 cities and 11 provinces.


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Philippine Resources - October 18, 2021

Faster approval process for renewable energy plants sought

Photo credit: SMA Solar Technology - Catalagan Solar Farm A lawmaker on Monday appealed to the Department of Energy (DOE) to expedite the process of approvals for power plants, especially for renewable energy (RE), as the possibility of “energy crunch” looms due to the impact of oil price hikes. Albay Rep. Joey Salceda said the possible “energy crunch”, or a rise in power and fuel costs, by mid-2022 can cause major problems for countries like the Philippines that import non-renewables for its energy needs, as it could dampen economic recovery. “The world is facing what could be a year of price hikes on coal, oil, natural gas, and other non-renewable energy sources. We are facing a confluence of factors. Oil is back where it was pre-pandemic. Natural gas is at all-time highs,” Salceda said. In response to disruptions and price hikes in fossil fuels, he recommended that the country diversify its energy portfolio quickly. “RE is just 24 percent of our energy sources, when we are both a net importer of fossil fuels, and an excellent location for all sorts of RE. One problem appears to me to be the approval process,” he said. He noted that the Renewable Energy Law imposes much more requirements on RE players than on traditional fossil fuel plants, which tend to discourage rather than encourage RE power plants. “We may need to review the Renewable Energy Law to see how we can expedite approval processes. The pre-development stage also tends to be long, up to three years, so we have to see how we can move quicker with that stage,” Salceda said. He said the ideal mix should be at least 40 percent renewable energy. “Our international commitment is to get that up to 35 percent by 2030, but we should do ourselves better by aiming for 40 percent, since almost all of our fossil fuels are imported,” Salceda said. Salceda also suggested that DOE should be a more regular part of discussions on the country’s economic recovery. “I’ve seen the national employment recovery strategy (NERS) and it says nothing about new power plants, which we sorely need, and which will definitely create new jobs. It’s not even in the National Employment Recovery task force,” he said. He said approving the creation of pending power plant applications will create new jobs. “You also need cheap power to create jobs. Moving forward, I hope the DOE is part of discussions on our economic recovery. Power costs remain an investor concern and a dampener on economic recovery,” he said. By Filane Mikee Cervantes   Article courtesy of Philippine News Agency

Industry

Philippine Resources - November 15, 2021

New RE plan targets 35% share of power generation by 2030

Photo credit: PhilStar The Philippines' proposed National Renewable Energy Program (NREP) 2020-2040 is setting a target of 35 percent share of renewable energy (RE) in the power generation mix by 2030 and 50 percent share by 2040. This was bared by Director Mylene C. Capongcol, OIC of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Renewable Energy Management Bureau, who in a recent online presentation acknowledged that instead of growing, the share of RE in the power generation mix has actually declined. She noted that in 2008, the year the Renewable Energy Act was passed, the share of RE was about 34 percent. Now it is down to 21 percent, or 21,609 gigawatt-hours (GWh), out of a total 101,756 GWh of power generated. The government is looking to revert the share of RE to 35 percent by 2030 and 50 percent by 2040 under the updated NREP, Capongcol said. The NREP sets the roadmap for achieving the country's RE goals as required by the Renewable Energy Act of 2008. Republic Act No. 9513, or the Renewable Energy Act, provides the framework for the development, utilization, and commercialization of RE sources, defined as resources that can be replenished regularly and are available indefinitely. These include biomass, solar, wind, geothermal, ocean energy, hydropower, and other emerging RE technologies. The Act affirms the government’s commitment to accelerate the utilization of RE resources in the country to reduce harmful emissions and achieve economic development while protecting the health and environment. The transition to RE from carbon-intensive energies has become even more urgent in light of the massive destruction being wrought by climate change and uncontrolled greenhouse gas emissions not just in the country but on a global scale. Capongcol, during the webinar, said the proposed NREP will be released soon. The updated plan seeks to help attain energy security, contribute to sustainable development, counter climate change, provide capability building, and secure inclusive growth for the country. To achieve the targets under the updated NREP 2020-2040, she said that while there have been a number of policies, initiatives, and programs that were developed and issued since 2011, “this is not enough.” “There are still a lot of improvements, a lot of new policies, emerging ones, that will support renewable energy development” to enable the country to meet its goals of self-sufficiency and cleaner energy," she said. She added that the DOE currently has innovative programs that are looking at the potentials of hydrogen, fusion, offshore wind, tidal energy, and other technologies. The DOE is also working on an expanded solar rooftop program and the improvement of solid waste management, while at the same time drafting a policy on geothermal energy development. Meanwhile, Jay Layug, president of Developers of Renewable Energy for Advancement, sought further improvements in the sector, citing the need in particular to upgrade the power infrastructure for RE such as building more power plants and improving transmission lines and distribution facilities. “Demand for power continues to grow and in the meantime supply is a problem,” he said, pointing out that many power plants in the country are at least 15 years old and starting to deteriorate. To solve these issues, Layug said the national government and local government units must address the challenges to private sector investment, including restrictive government regulations, rigid process for offtake agreements, numerous requirements for permits and licenses, and a lack of integration in government support. He also pressed for the pursuit of policy reform, particularly by declaring renewables as the preferred energy resource, to reduce the importation of fossil fuel and vulnerability to price volatility. His other recommendations included strengthening public-private partnerships; creating a one-stop-shop for RE; simplifying the rules for deployment of personnel, vessels, machinery, equipment spare parts and materials; and resolving inter-agency coordination issues. In the same webinar by the Liveable Cities Challenge Philippines, British Ambassador to the Philippines Laure Beaufils, in her message highlighted the importance of utilizing RE in the country. “The transition to clean and renewable energy sources, such as geothermal, hydro, wind and solar, which are already abundant in the Philippines, will help end the dependence on expensive imported fuel and lower electricity costs especially for lower-income, climate-vulnerable Filipino families,” Beaufils said.   Article courtesy of the Philippine News Agency

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Marcelle P. Villegas - November 24, 2022

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Mining

Philippine Resources - November 15, 2022

Celsius obtains Social License to operate for the MCB Project

Photo credit: Celsius Resources Limited Celsius Resources Limited is pleased to announce that one of its Philippine subsidiaries, Makilala Mining Company, Inc. (“MMCI”) has obtained the consent of the Balatoc Indigenous Cultural Community (ICC) for the development of the Company’s MaalinaoCaigutan-Biyog (MCB) Copper-Gold Project (“MCB” or “the Project”). After a series of consultations and negotiations, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between MMCI, the Balatoc ICC, and the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP) was officially signed on 14 November 2022. The MOA represents the collective decision of the Balatoc ICC for MMCI to carry out exploration, development, production, and operation activities at the MCB Project area. It also outlines the commitments and obligations of all parties to the agreement as well as the economic, social, environmental, and cultural benefits of the Project to the Balatoc ICC during the life of the mine. Pasil Municipal Mayor Alfredo B. Malannag, Jr. was elated with the outcome and expressed: “This is a historical moment as it reflects the aspirations of the community for the future of the Balatoc Tribe. With MMCI at the forefront of development, our dreams of harnessing our natural resources without sacrificing our future and the environment will soon be realised. We have partnered with MMCI since their first exploration in the area in 2006 and the community has established a very good relationship with them.” Kalinga Provincial Governor James S. Edduba shared the same sentiment: “This is a happy occasion, and I am excited with the many possibilities that will happen to this community with the signing of the MOA. Growing up in the place, I can personally attest to life with and without a mining company. I was the Mayor of Pasil when Makilala Mining started their exploration. We have gone a long way and MMCI has been instrumental in the development of the community. I believe that this partnership will help develop the community further as this is such a big investment in terms of business and employment opportunities, overall progress and other benefits.” The Company considers obtaining the consent of the Balatoc ICC to be a crucial aspect for the development of the MCB Project, as it represents a social license to operate which is anchored on legitimacy, credibility, and trust. MMCI President Atty. Julito R. Sarmiento expressed: “The signing of the agreement signifies the commitment of the Company to do right by the Balatoc ICC. We have always ensured that we abide and respect the customary laws and traditions of the community in all aspects of our engagements, to demonstrate our strict adherence to Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) principles and best practices consistent with our firm commitment to Transformative Mining.”   Article courtesy of Celsius Resources

Mining

Philippine Resources - November 15, 2022

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Photo credit: Apex Mining Apex Mining Co., Inc. is enjoying the fruits of its continuous expansion program with both the 3Q2022 and 9mo2022 results at an all-time high. Production for the 3Q2022 stood at 26,962 oz for gold and 100,899 oz for silver. The volume was 35% and 15% higher, respectively, than previous year’s production. The Maco mine milled 209,585 tonnes, 14% higher YoY with daily mill throughput of 2,334 tpd with mill grades of 4.02 gpt for gold and 18.72 gpt for silver. In the 3 rd quarter, the foreign exchange rate averaged P56.62 vs P50.30 from 3Q2021 or an increase of 13%. The resulting gross revenues for the third quarter was P2.743 billion, an increase of 43.8% YoY. Consolidated net income for 3Q2022 amounted to P897.95 million vs net loss of P624.35 million for 3Q2021, a 244% increase YoY. During the 3Q2021, the Company recognized P1.1 Billion provision for impairment of property and equipment and deferred exploration costs of non-operational local and foreign subsidiaries of Monte Oro Resources & Energy, Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Apex. For the 9mo2022, total production was 73,219 oz gold and 291,333 oz silver or an increase of 36% and 12% respectively. Realized prices were $1,817/oz for gold and $21.62/oz for silver, a change of +2% and -13% respectively. Milling throughput for the Maco Mine Site was 601,730 tonnes or 2, 299 tpd for the 9mo2022, as compared to 514,008 tonnes or 2,017 tpd for the same period in 2021. The weighted average foreign exchange rate during the comparative period was P53.85 and P49.03 to one USD, a gap of 10%. The resulting gross revenues for the three quarters of 2022 was higher at P7.51 billion compared to the same period in 2021 at P4.99 billion. The net income (loss) for the three quarters of 2022 and 2021 was P2.46 billion and (P135.73) million. Net income grew 1,913% YoY. Disaster relief is among the cornerstones of Apex Mining’s corporate citizenship initiatives. As the third quarter was drawing to a close in September, typhoon Karding battered Luzon. In tandem with the Philippine Mine Safety and Environment Association (PMSEA), though Pusong Minero, Apex Mining’s president and CEO, Luis R. Sarmiento, ASEAN Eng., who is also the president of PMSEA, condoled with the families of the five Bulacan PDRRMO rescuers who perished while conducting rescue activities during the said tropical depression. At the Luksang Parangal of the Bulacan Provincial Advisory Group for Police Transformation and Development, the families of the late rescuers received cash assistance. Earlier, in August, the four classrooms built by the GMA Kapuso Foundation, in part through a P2M donation by the company, was turned over to the students and teachers of the Baybay Elementary School in the island of Siargao (Siargao, including Baybay Elementary School, was badly hit by typhoon Odette in December 2021). Apex Mining found itself displaying its unique brand of malaskit yet again as the final quarter of 2022 opened with typhoon Paeng wreaking havoc in regions 5, 6, 8, 12 and the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (BARMM). Still under the Pusong Minero program of the PMSEA, the company, together with concerned local governments, immediately deployed much needed supplies like drinking water, sleeping mats and sacks of rice to select areas badly hit by Paeng. The distribution of sleeping mats is a joint effort with the province of Davao de Oro, where Apex Mining’s Maco Mine is located.   Article courtesy of Apex Mining

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